Freelancer Focus 12th October 2007

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I am looking for more people who would be interested in taking part in Freelancer Focus please see this post for details if you are interested. I am also interested in design case studies too.

Freelance DesignerFreelancer Focus is a regular feature, where freelance designers are invited to answer a series of questions about themselves and freelancing. This week Von R. Glitschka (pictured left) is the freelance designer in question. If you would like to take part please read my previous post. Any designer or illustrator can also take part in Design Case Studies.

1. Your name?
Von R. Glitschka

2. Where are you are based (Country/Area)?
Salem, Oregon USA

3. What type of work do you do? (design for print, web, multimedia etc)
Illustrative Design.

4. How many years had you been working in the design industry before you went freelance?
15 years.

5. How long have you been freelancing?
Almost 6 years now.

6. Why did you decide to go freelance?
I got fired.

7. How did you market yourself (find design work/new clients) in the beginning – (online portfolio/brochure/direct mail/email/phone etc)?
Most of my work came form my previous contacts over 15 years.

8. How do you market yourself (find design work) now?
Self promotion mailings, viral advertising, source book ad and I have an art rep.

9. How did you decide what to charge? What was the process?
I quote all projects using flat fees and or usage and buyout agreements. I don’t work by the hour.

10. Do you work from home/have an office/work inhouse at design agencies?

I have a studio in my home.

11. How do you organise your workload, do you work long hours?
I have a methodical creative process and yes I usually work too much.

12. How much holiday do you give yourself?
Every summer we take at 2-4 weeks off. I also take days off during the year just to refresh when I get burnt out too.

13. How do you keep up to date with what is happening in the industry?
The agencies I work for are plugged into the current genre’s so that helps. Other then that it’s subscribing to culture based publications and being active in online design sites and forums.

14. What blogs, magazines, podcasts etc do you subscribe to?
Blogs: Brand New
Magazines: WIRED, Fast Company, INC
Podcasts: http://www.theillustrativedesigner.com, BA Design Cast

15. How do you generate ideas/what techniques do you use to stimulate creativity?
I stay creatively curious. Always trying new things, taking on projects that stretch my comfort zones etc.

16. What about the business side of things, accounting, invoicing, bookkeeping, how do you manage it?
I have a CPA that does all the big stuff. I handing sending out invoices myself still.

17. What is the biggest piece of advice you would give to someone starting out freelancing?
Don’t wait until your slow to promote. Do it when your busy. That way you may have slow times but you’ll never be absolutely dead in the water.

18. Would you ever go back to fulltime work?
Unless Pixar comes calling no.

19. Any thing else you would like to add?
I just had my first book published: http://www.texturebook.com

20. Where can we see some of your work (URL)?
Below and http://www.glitschka.com

Freelancer Focus 5th October 2007

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I am looking for more people who would be interested in taking part in Freelancer Focus please see this post for details if you are interested. I am also interested in design case studies too.

Freelance DesignerFreelancer Focus is a regular feature, where freelance designers are invited to answer a series of questions about themselves and freelancing. This week Stephen Tiano (pictured left) is the freelance designer in question. If you would like to take part please read my previous post. Any designer or illustrator can also take part in Design Case Studies.

1. Your name?
Stephen Tiano

2. Where are you are based (Country/Area)?
U.S./Northeast/Long Island/Calverton, NY

3. What type of work do you do? (design for print, web, multimedia etc)
Book design and layout

4. How many years had you been working in the design industry before you went freelance?
0

5. How long have you been freelancing?
15 years

6. Why did you decide to go freelance?
I had an unrelated full-time job after having worked for a typesetter that went bankrupt.

7. How did you market yourself (find design work/new clients) in the beginning – (online portfolio/brochure/direct mail/email/phone etc)?
In the very beginning, I answered remotely relevant ads in the New York Times and Newsday seeking in-house employees; but I asked about off-site freelancing.

8. How do you market yourself (find design work) now?
Online. For the past 10 or so years, I have sent out a twice yearly email querying every publisher in the current year’s Writer’s Market that listed an email address or a website address from which I could uncover a way to email them. I attach my resume and a packet of work samples in PDF.

9. How did you decide what to charge? What was the process?
I price each project individually. I have a range of rates that take into account things like the complexity of the work, whether it involves math and equations, has tabular material, and involves scanning and correcting art. For page layout, I actually factor it by a per page rate.

10. Do you work from home/have an office/work in-house at design agencies?
I work from my studio-office at home.

11. How do you organise your workload, do you work long hours?
I put in long hours when they’re called for. I’m a bit of a night owl, so I actually like working deep into the night and taking naps.

12. How much holiday do you give yourself?
I really don’t have a set schedule for that. My wife and I have young granddaughters on the opposite coast, so vacation time often coincides with our going there or their coming to visit us.

13. How do you keep up to date with what is happening in the industry?
By reading magazines and newspapers. By reading and commenting on blogs and online forums. By blogging on my own blog.

14. What blogs, magazines, podcasts etc do you subscribe to?
I don’t actually subscribe to any blogs—rather I go to the blogs linked to the blogroll on my own blog many times each day.

15. How do you generate ideas/what techniques do you use to stimulate creativity?
By reading. Every book and magazine is an example of page design.

16. What about the business side of things, accounting, invoicing, bookkeeping, how do you manage it?
I hold on to every receipt and bill. My wife keeps track of them. And then come tax season we go thru them together and update an Excel spreadsheet.

17. What is the biggest piece of advice you would give to someone starting out freelancing?
Be prepared to spend at least half your time finding clients and networking for that purpose.

18. Would you ever go back to fulltime work?
Working in-house for the typesetter as a proofreader—and before that as a proofreader and copy editor for a legal publisher—was quite enough.

19. Any thing else you would like to add?
Yes. I’m particularly interested in book design and layout projects working on illustrated children’s storybooks, cookbooks, and books with heavy math and equations.

20. Where can we see some of your work (URL)?
There are work samples on the site, www.tianodesign.com. My blog also gives a sense of who I am and what I do. The blog is at www.tianodesign.com/blog.

Freelancer Focus 28th September 2007

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I am looking for more people who would be interested in taking part in Freelancer Focus please see this post for details if you are interested. I am also interested in design case studies too.

Freelance DesignerFreelancer Focus is a regular feature, where freelance designers are invited to answer a series of questions about themselves and freelancing. This week Amanda Vlahakis (pictured left) is the freelance designer in question. If you would like to take part please read my previous post. Any designer or illustrator can also take part in Design Case Studies.

1. Your name?
Amanda Vlahakis

2. Where are you are based (Country/Area)?
Birmingham, England

3. What type of work do you do? (design for print, web, multimedia etc)
Logo design, front end web design, print design and illustration.

4. How many years had you been working in the design industry before you went freelance?
I’ve never worked in industry, I decided to teach myself graphic design and then went straight into freelance. Please don’t stop reading, I’m a professional designer I promise! ha ha…

5. How long have you been freelancing?
Over 5 years, close to 6 now I think.

6. Why did you decide to go freelance?
I needed a job I could do at home so that I could look after my children myself rather than send them to nursery whilst I worked. I didn’t need a job for financial reasons, rather that I wanted to have a career because I enjoy having a career, and quickly realised that this where my talents lay.

7. How did you market yourself (find design work/new clients) in the beginning – (online portfolio/brochure/direct mail/email/phone etc)?
In the beginning I mainly acquired clients through a mix of online business networking (so basically word of mouth) and search engine optimisation to drive visitors to my website and then convert them into sales. I still use these very effective methods amongst other marketing activity and the website is geared to convert customers by being very informative and featuring comprehensive portfolio pages.

8. How do you market yourself (find design work) now?
Using the same methods in the beginning because they are very effective, but also in addition I carry out article marketing (which is really just more search engine optimisation) and addition this year incorporating a blog feature to promote customer confidence and interractivity and also again, one more, for seo reasons!

9. How did you decide what to charge? What was the process?
Charging has usually been decided based on my hourly rate (decided based on my standard of design) x time taken to complete average tasks – I charge ‘per project’ rather than on an hourly rate.

I then take those fees and compare them to competitors charging structures to ensure they are competitive on a like for like basis and that includes taking into consideration factors such as; standard of portfolio/design, range of services available in ‘in one shop’, standard of customer service, speed, and professionalism, experience, reputation, customer support and backup.

10. Do you work from home/have an office/work inhouse at design agencies?
I only ever work from home and always have done. I have a large self contained office in the top floor (loft/attic) of our home.

11. How do you organise your workload, do you work long hours?
I work very flexible hours rather than the standard 9-5 and that’s because I work around my children, who are still very young (3 and 6). I don’t work long hours each week, definitely no more than 45 hours a week on the whole unless going through a very busy period. I have worked around my children since my first was born – indeed they were the reason I started a business from home in the first place.

I typically start work at 10am (do the school run first!) and then I often don’t stop working until 9-10pm at night on a weekday. This doesn’t mean that I work a 10hour day in the weekdays – instead large chunks of my day are spent with my children and so I actually only work a standard 35-40hours each week. On the weekends I usually work a few hours of each day also, especially if very busy.

So my hours are very flexibly spread over the day to suit the needs of my family, and it’s very common for my children to be playing in the office with me during the day when I work because one of them isn’t at school or nursery yet …the office is very large and there are plenty of toys to occupy them! My children respect my desire to work and happily play whilst I put my head down and do a bit of work.

I feel I’m teaching them a good work ethic whilst encouraging them to also respect other peoples needs and desires at the same time.

12. How much holiday do you give yourself?
In the first 1-2yrs of starting the business the answer was barely any because really you do have to seriously invest some time in the beginning to get your business of the ground and I was dealing with that at the same time as looking after a baby, but now I’m established I take a good 3-4 weeks a year, and whilst I sometimes take my laptop, there is no working other than to maybe clear my spam emails so it’s not such a horror task at the end of the holiday, or to sometimes write a blog.

I never go away for more than a week at a time though, firstly I worry that my clients ‘need me’ and also I start to get bored and miss my work anyway after a week 🙂

13. How do you keep up to date with what is happening in the industry?
Visiting blogs like yours, visiting different websites, and just looking at the world of design around me….design is literally everywhere.

14. What blogs, magazines, podcasts etc do you subscribe to?
Non, I’m afraid with two young children that my husband and I care for ourselves, and a full time business, there is very little time left for regular reading of blogs or podcasts. If I spent time on these, I’d never have any time for the business, so I only usually visit these for research purposes.

15. How do you generate ideas/what techniques do you use to stimulate creativity?
Hmmm, difficult one…errr I guess the ideas just seem to come to me from somewhere, I don’t really have a method…I tend to read my design brief and then sit and think and look at my blank screen until ideas come to me and then I test them out until I arrive at the right concept. Visual stimulation is all around us I feel and everything around me tends to give me ideas that I use in my work; fashion, interior design, advertising, tv and movie media and more.

16. What about the business side of things, accounting, invoicing, bookkeeping, how do you manage it?
I’m naturally very very organised so this side of things has been easy. I tend to have a specific method for every single bit of administration I have…everything has a method, a timescale and so on. This means projects are always delivered swiftly and nothing gets forgotten or overlooked. Organisation is just as important as good design.

17. What is the biggest piece of advice you would give to someone starting out freelancing?
Just one piece? Hmmm that’s very hard! Can I give a few?

– Do lots of marketing and don’t neglect your marketing when you are busy with design work.

– Paid advertising rarely works as well as methods such as networking and search engine optimisation, in fact I’d go so far as to say don’t bother with paying for adverts, especially in directories.

– Be very very organised…deliver your projects on time.

– Don’t underestimate the importance of customer communications; be very clear in what you offer, ensure that a written acceptance of your ‘terms’ is in force and that the customer fully understands what exactly and specifically is on offer for what price, don’t forget to specify what happens for changes and revisions. Ensure that you take a deposit for every project before you start work, and that your attention to detail about your terms is also applied to your design brief information gathering; good design starts with good communication and research; listen to your client properly.

In fact that last one – all of that is probably the most important advice actually.

18. Would you ever go back to fulltime work?
Never never never, I love freelance.

19. Any thing else you would like to add?
Errr, I’ve talked your head off, so nothing 🙂

20. Where can we see some of your work (URL)?
www.trulyace.com – lots to see and read!

Freelancer Focus 21st September 2007

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I am looking for more people who would be interested in taking part in Freelancer Focus please see this post for details if you are interested. I am also interested in design case studies too.

Freelance DesignerFreelancer Focus is a regular feature, where freelance designers are invited to answer a series of questions about themselves and freelancing. This week Jason Fisher-Jones (pictured left) is the freelance designer in question. If you would like to take part please read my previous post. Any designer or illustrator can also take part in Design Case Studies.

1. Your Name?
Jason Fisher-Jones

2. Where are you based?

Los Angeles, California

3. What type of work do you do?

Commercials, On-Air Branding, Network Promos.

4. How many years had you been working in the design industry before you went freelance?

9 years – I was at my first full-time job right out of college, the same company for 8 years. The idea of not being employed terrified me, never mind in another country. A couple of other full time positions followed.

5. How long have you been freelancing?
5 years

6. Why did you decide to go freelance?
I’d moved to New York from London to work for Razorfish back in 2000, right as the bubble was in mid burst. Oblivious to the fact the company was falling apart around me, I continued there for 2 years as the office began to dwindle. When I was finally (and mercifully) laid-off, I realized I had an incredible network of contacts who’d all got laid off before me.

7. How did you market yourself (find design work/new clients) in the beginning – (online portfolio/brochure/direct mail/email/phone etc)?
Despite working for Razorfish for 2 years I had no idea how to make a website, so a DVD showreel was the only way to get my work seen. Though in reality it was entirely word of mouth (see question 6). I was rubbish at sending out reels, people would call up and I’d forget to send anything.

8. How do you market yourself (find design work) now?
The internet is a wonderful thing. I sat down with a book and taught myself basic Flash one weekend – being able to email a simple link is proving much easier than mailing a DVD. I just moved to LA, and in doing so thrown myself into completely alien territory. The contacts I had from New York are still there and I can work remotely, but my intention is to develop new contacts. It involves emailing my link to friends of friends, meeting with agents, getting recommendations from previous clients. And it’s not proving easy.

9. How did you decide what to charge? What was the process?
I’d heard what day rates freelancers were charging at Razorfish, and they all seemed to be getting so much more than me, so I based it on that initially. I also charge a flat project fee, and that depends on the client who often comes in with a budget first. The nature of the job also reflects on the rate – live-action direction commands far greater fees than design or art direction, and that’s usually negotiated with a production company to industry standards.

10. Do you work from home/have an office/work inhouse at design agencies?
Divided between home and in-house, and which I prefer is usually the one I’ve spent the least time at. Home offers so much freedom, but in-house provides human contact and often inspiration.

11. How do you organise your workload, do you work long hours?

For a long time I’d take on multiple jobs and work into the night, but recently I’ve become better at turning down work. That said, a new town and finding new clients has meant some serious down-time, and I’m all too ready to jump back in.

12. How much holiday do you give yourself?

Leaving the UK has meant most time off is used traveling home – christmas, weddings etc. But I’ve always made a point of planning a trip somewhere other than home at least once a year.

13. How do you keep up to date with what is happening in the industry?
Despite the ubiquity of the internet and wonderful blogs like this, I find a wander into a design book store is one of the most inspiring things to do. Physically picking up a book or periodical and flicking through it is just a more immediate experience. Oh, and watching TV.

14. What about the business side of things, accounting, invoicing, bookkeeping, how do you manage it?
I keep it very simple – usually a verbal agreement on the phone regarding fee, then an invoice at the end of the job. If it’s a long project, I bill every 2 weeks, or a first 50% on a project fee. I have a text file with a list of what’s paid and what’s pending. Once a year I spend a day adding and organizing my receipts. That’s it. I have an accountant who does the rest.

15. What is the biggest piece of advice you would give to someone starting out freelancing?
I set up a company to do business in the US, so there was some legal and accountancy advice necessary. The best part of freelancing is knowing you’re getting paid for everything you do – the harder you work, the more you earn – but you have to feel confident in yourself and be prepared for some slow times. Doing nothing is the hardest thing to do.

16. Would you ever go back to fulltime work?
I’d consider it in the short term – perhaps a year or two. Joining a company often means access to higher profile work, especially in higher positions as companies are usually more interested in building their own employees portfolios (at least that’s my experience).

17. Any thing else you would like to add?
If you don’t try it you’ll never know.

18. Where can we see some of your work (URL)?

www.jasonfisherjones.com

Freelancer Focus 14th September 2007

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I am looking for more people who would be interested in taking part in Freelancer Focus please see this post for details if you are interested. I am also interested in design case studies too.

Freelance DesignerFreelancer Focus is a regular feature, where freelance designers are invited to answer a series of questions about themselves and freelancing. This week Rob Cubbon (pictured left) is the freelance designer in question. If you would like to take part please read my previous post. Any designer or illustrator can also take part in Design Case Studies.

1. Your name?
Rob Cubbon

2. Where are you are based (Country/Area)?

London. UK.

3. What type of work do you do? (design for print, web, multimedia etc)
Design for print and web

4. How many years had you been working in the design industry before you went freelance?
I was working in publishing for nearly 3 years as a picture researcher (do they exist now?)

5. How long have you been freelancing?
15 years

6. Why did you decide to go freelance?
I didn’t like office politics and working for other people

7. How did you market yourself (find design work/new clients) in the beginning – (online portfolio/brochure/direct mail/email/phone etc)?
In the beginning I wrote letters and phoned (this was 1993), I have also used agencies.

8. How do you market yourself (find design work) now?
I market myself as a cheap all-rounder who can do all sorts of things and has contacts in various different areas of design who can get things done. All through the website.

9. How did you decide what to charge? What was the process?
The law of supply and demand, I think.

10. Do you work from home/have an office/work inhouse at design agencies?
Home and inhouse at design agencies.

11. How do you organise your workload, do you work long hours?
I don’t organise my workload. Sometimes long hours, sometimes a bit of free time.

12. How much holiday do you give yourself?
I take time off when my wife has her holiday.

13. How do you keep up to date with what is happening in the industry?

I should say the internet, but as I’m always at various design studios in London I usually pick things up that way.

14. What about the business side of things, accounting, invoicing, bookkeeping, how do you manage it?
All at the last minute with a lot of swear words. This is my first year as a limited company so I’m a bit worried. The advent of internet banking and completing a tax return online should make the process a bit less painful.

15. What is the biggest piece of advice you would give to someone starting out freelancing?

Make sure you’ve got a spare £1000 in the bank.

16. Would you ever go back to fulltime work?
Never.

17. Any thing else you would like to add?
I think that what I do is totally modern, without trying to sound pretentious. Anyone, literally, anyone, could contact me today and ask me to do literally anything. And I love that.

18. Where can we see some of your work (URL)?
www.robcubbon.com/

design work

Freelancer Focus 7th September

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I am looking for more people who would be interested in taking part in Freelancer Focus please see this post for details if you are interested. I am also interested in design case studies too.

Freelance DesignerFreelancer Focus is a regular feature, where freelance designers are invited to answer a series of questions about themselves and freelancing. This week Jorge Goyco (pictured left) is the freelance designer in question. If you would like to take part please read my previous post. Any designer or illustrator can also take part in Design Case Studies.

1. Your name?
Jorge Goyco

2. Where are you are based (Country/Area)?
USA, College Station, Texas. It’s sort of Central and East in Texas.

3. What type of work do you do? (design for print, web, multimedia etc)
Web and print design and production. I design in Photoshop, InDesign, Dreamweaver and Flash. I started doing just print, but moved to websites when I wanted to promote my band.

4. How many years had you been working in the design industry before you went freelance?
Well, in High School in 1987-1989 I used PageMaker (when it was owned by Aldus) working on the yearbook. In college I learned Quark on a Mac IIsi, bought an LCII with Photoshop 2.0 and Illustrator 88. Clipping paths and drop shadows were such a pain back then. I’d say I worked for real from 1992 until sometime in 1997, and then started my own business in 2003.

5. How long have you been freelancing?
My first Paying Freelance job was probably T-shirt designs for the church I was attending some time in 1998. It wasn’t until I got laid off from a web design firm in 2001, and then fired from a Design Studio in 2003 that I went full time freelance. I was doing freelance jobs the whole time while working at those other jobs at home on my Performa 6300.

6. Why did you decide to go freelance?

Well, I was afraid that I wouldn’t have enough work, but I had started to get more and more clients. When I got fired, I went to some friends of mine and they promised me $1000 a week for a month if I worked on anything they threw at me. They were very sweet to do that. They had been the ones hounding me the most about quitting and starting my own business. Getting fired made it easy.

7. How did you market yourself (find design work/new clients) in the beginning – (online portfolio/brochure/direct mail/email/phone etc)?
Honestly, it’s all mostly been word of mouth. I’ve never taken out ads in the yellow pages and newspapers. Basically, I went to Kinko’s and printed black and white cards and told everyone I knew that I had started my own company. Someone always had a brother in law who’s daughter’s husband needed a website for their company. Something like that. There are actually maybe 3 people I can pinpoint as to have started the network. I can look at a client I have now (5 years later) and go back all the way to the beginning, which leads me to one of those three people. Lately, since having moved from San Antonio, a new network has started.

8. How do you market yourself (find design work) now?
Really in the same way, sort of. Most clients come from either past clients, or from relations with agencies or design firms. For me to know design and html, I’m really a commodity. Next thing I need to lern is PHP and ASP, then I’ll have it all…well, not really. I contract out programming, I don’t have the brain for it much past simple Actionscript in Flash.

Although now I have a much better grasp on SEO and my website is much better than it used to be, much more focused, you know? I also have 2 blogs that drive traffic to my business site. One is a webmaster tips blog (http://jorgegoyco.blogspot.com) and the other is a children’s stories blog (http://papistories.blogspot.com).

Truth is, most of the contacts I get from the website are people who’s budget is very small, and I just can’t afford to chase those down. I tell them my prices and that’s usually the last I hear of them. My website is primarily for the portfolio and linking out to my other websites.

I’ve actually tried pounding the pavement, but it’s not usually fruitful.

9. How did you decide what to charge? What was the process?

I started charging like $25 an hour, but I quickly found out that it was way too low. The advice given to me by other designers was that I needed to up my prices for a couple of reasons. One is that it cheapens the quality of the industry. If they have a client that claims that they can get the same work from someone charging $25 per hour, it just muddies things up. The second was that people tend to perceive the work you do as better if it’s more expensive. I’ve found this to be true. Honestly, age has made me realize what my work (and time) is worth.

Lately, I charge per hour only if it’s maintenance or if the client requests it. I’ve got flat fees for websites etc. I’ve come to learn what people are willing to pay for my kind of services, and still satisfying my need to pay my bills.

10. Do you work from home/have an office/work inhouse at design agencies?
I work from home. I’m on satellite broadband out in the country where the cables from the closest town don’t reach. I have worked in-house at a few places for a few hours a day, and also accept business from agencies.

11. How do you organise your workload, do you work long hours?

I don’t usually work long hours. It depends on the deadlines, but I’m not a procrastinator. I try to give myself room with the client and add a day to when I think I can have it for them, then if I finish it, I have tome to tweak, I’m not in a rush, can juggle other small jobs around the big ones, and can even impress the client by getting it in early…not too early.

I work a couple of hours in the morning, and take lunch with my family, then work from after lunch to dinner time. Of course, it all depends on if I can smell what my wife is cooking or not if I come down early or send that last email at 4:59PM. My wife has been known to sautee onions and garlic to get me to come down.

After the kids go down, we come upstairs and browse. Sometimes I blog, sometimes I finish jobs, sometimes we just watch movies.

12. How much holiday do you give yourself?
I take days off all the time. I usually try to start long weekends on Wednesday night until Sunday or Monday. I just make sure I’ve got no big deadlines and I’m good to go. The thing about working at home is that I can take a few minutes to help catch grasshoppers or race around the yard in our go-cart any time I want…almost any time I want.

13. How do you keep up to date with what is happening in the industry?
I read blogs every day. I read how-to’s online all the time. I go to Flashkit.com regularly, I read about Photoshop tips and tricks, and even borrow books from the library. I learned a bunch from library books just recently on Flash 8. That or go and have a coffe at a bookstore and read for a while.

14. What about the business side of things, accounting, invoicing, bookkeeping, how do you manage it?
My wife and I have created a bunch of Excel documents that are all interconnected with formulas for taxes and hosting and invoicing. I do all of it. I’m more trusting of Excel’s math abilities than my wife is. She’d rather do it by hand. I like that I can make one change and five documents are updated. Excel is cool

15. What is the biggest piece of advice you would give to someone starting out freelancing?
Back up your accounting. Actually, buy an external hard drive and back up everything at least every week. It is really, really expensive to retrieve information from a crashed hard drive. I had it fairly cheap, and it still cost me $1600 to retrieve the information of a 40Gb ibook hard drive, and all I needed was a few small excel documents.

16. Would you ever go back to fulltime work?
I don’t want to. Can’t say I never will. It would really have to be worth it. I’ve got it pretty good right now working at home.

17. Any thing else you would like to add?

It’s not going to be easy to get rich being a graphic designer, but it’s been fun. Invest in real estate too. Do something that doesn’t take electricity as well. Grow a garden. The trick with that is to plant it at the right time (it should say when on the package), and then water it. Try canteloupes…they’re yummy.

18. Where can we see some of your work (URL)?

http://www.goycodesign.com
http://www.papistories.blogspot.com
http://www.jorgegoyco.blogspot.com