10 Marvelously Modern Free Fonts for Graphic Design

A guest post by Brian Morris who writes for the PsPrint Design & Printing Blog.

Your choice of font can make or break your design. A great font helps the rest of your design set a mood, elicit emotion, and motivate action; while a poor font distracts from your message and can ruin your entire design. If you’re creating a design that has a decidedly modern tone, the following 10 fonts can usher your artwork into modernity marvelously. Best of all, each modern font listed here is free to download!

1. Sansation

This versatile font can be used for headlines, subheads, and even body copy on both print and digital media.
www.dafont.com/sansation.font

sansation

2. Magalopolis

Your poster can’t be ignored when you use this bold, heavy, and exciting font.
www.smeltery.net/fonts/megalopolis-extra

magalopolis

3. Quicksand

Quicksand is clean and modern, with evident rounding on heavier weights, which means it will work well in print and digital designs, either as a headline or body copy.
www.typophile.com/node/50437

quicksand

4. Carbon

Want to add a splash of elegance to big, bold headlines? Carbon is the solution. It’s perfect for large web sales headers!
www.urbanfonts.com/fonts/Carbon.htm

carbon

5. Tondu Beta

If you’re seeking a bold, modern alternative to Helvetica, Tondu Beta is a great option that combines classic elements with modern touches.
www.fontspace.com/jonathan-hill/tondu-beta

tondu

6. FoglihtenNo04

Choose FoglihtenNo04 for style; it’s perfect for event announcements, greeting cards, and posters that must include a certain level of sophistication without sacrificing the fun factor.
www.fontspace.com/gluk/foglihtenno04

foglighten

7. Ice Cream Soda

Ice cream soda combines a retro feel with modern touches and is distinctive enough to be used as part of a brand logo.
www.fontm.com/ice-cream-soda-font/

ice-cream-soda

8. Wireframe

Any web designer will understand the basis for this font, but its use isn’t limited to designs that feature the web. Clean, modern, and bold, the Wireframe font would make a great headline typeface, but should be avoided for body copy.
www.fontm.com/wireframe-font/

wireframe

9. Joe Hand 2

Many designs incorporate handwritten fonts to convey a sense of a personal touch. Joe Hand 2 is a perfect font for adding those personal accents to your websites, brochures, and even business cards.
www.dafont.com/joehand-2.font

joehand

10. Pincoya Black

Pincoya Black is a fun, bold font that could be used for poster and web-based headlines. It’s attention-getting and energetic, memorable and entertaining.
www.behance.net/Gallery/Pincoya-Black-Typeface/496023

pincoya

Have you used these fonts in any of your designs? If so, share them with us in the comments below! We’d love to see how you applied styles to modern fonts in your own graphic designs.

Author’s Bio: Brian Morris writes for the PsPrint Design & Printing Blog. PsPrint is an online commercial printing company. Follow PsPrint on Twitter @PsPrint and Facebook.

5 Tips for Creating Engaging Infographics

A guest post by Luke Clum

Infographics are an extremely potent tool in internet marketing. Easily shared, infographics use visuals to convey interesting information. ‘Data Viz’ (that’s data visualisation) packs a powerful punch by conveying information in a way that creates a lasting impact. Infographics are all about dissemination, and when done well, can be extremely powerful. But wait! Don’t jump on the data viz bandwagon without stopping and thinking first. Take these tips into account and you’ll be creating compelling infographics that spread like wildfire.

1. Think Purpose

Some of the worst infographics are those that seem to lack purpose, and are simply a poor attempt at creating something ‘worth’ sharing. Think before you begin. What questions are you trying to answer? What information are you trying to convey? Sometimes, no matter how you look at it, written content will do the best job, so trying to ‘force’ an infographic will just look like an over-reach.

infographic 1

Versus

infographic 1B

Look at the above images, which works better? Here, Travel Match’s written information gets the message across far more clearly than the infographic – which shows that data visualisations aren’t always appropriate.

Brainstorm your ideas and think about your question from the perspective of your visitors. What would they want to know? You want to leave them feeling satisfied yet intrigued. Your infographic should be good enough to share whilst also encouraging them to dig deeper into your site.

2. Do Your Research

A badly researched infographic looks just as terrible as poorly edited written content. It’s unprofessional and sloppy. No one will share an infographic that’s full of errors, so do your research. Fact based infographics are the most successful, so try not to use opinion based data as you want your infographic to appear reputable, just like your business. For example, look at this infographic on internet networks and bandwidth. Notice how it uses bandwidth statistics to visually display which sites/software hog connection speeds – the numbers speak for themselves.

infographic 2

3. Keep It Clear

Use engaging colours, and images that are simple but effective. Too many colours or graphics can crowd your infographic, making it harder to understand. You want to avoid confusion, conveying your information in a way that requires very little effort from your visitor.

You don’t need custom illustrations to create an engaging infographic. Using icon images avoids complicating your design.

infographic 3

Here, part of Brightcove’s Making Video Content Work infographic uses icons effectively to get their message across—without overdoing it.

4. Try Visual Metaphors

Using visual metaphors to represent an idea is an effective way of turning ‘dry’ information into something engaging and memorable. What’s more, when done well, visual metaphors can be understood by a wide variety of people. Grant Thornton’s Race to Economic Growth is a great example.

infographic 5

5. Use Visual Comparisons

Sometimes when creating an infographic what you’re really looking to achieve is impact. Visual comparisons are a great way to get a message to really hit home.
Frugal Dad’s The Weight of Walmart infographic uses visual comparisons over and over again to give the viewer a real sense of perspective on the issue at hand.

infographic 6

The illustration shows us what 10x larger looks like…

infographic 7

… and how $421 billion compares to $19.8 billion.

The main thing that you should take away from these tips is that infographics are all about making data user friendly. You want to increase interest and comprehension in a way that supersedes the use of text alone.

Luke Clum Luke Clum is a graphic designer from Seattle who specializes in print and web development. He loves coffee, hiking and alpine climbing in the mountains. Follow him on Twitter @lukeclum

Licensing Cute Art with Designer and Illustrator Kathy Weller

Kathy Weller illustrator and designer who licenses her workI am really excited to have an interview with Kathy Weller from WellerWishes.

I must have contacted Kathy a year or two ago and asked if she would consider doing an interview about licensing her cute design and illustrations. As it was still early days for Kathy licensing her work she told me she would be happy to do an interview when she had a bit more experience behind her.

So for any designer or illustrator looking to license their work, read on to get some great advice on how to go about it.

1. Please could you tell me a little bit about yourself, your background and what you do now?

My name is Kathy Weller. My studio is called WellerWishes. I am an illustrator, designer, greeting card writer and artist, and product thinker-upper. I specialize in creating characters, making them the stars of my busy, “big scene” illustrations, and also writing humor for them.

I work with manufacturers, and I create art and product ideas for their products. I also maintain my own online portal site / shop / blog called WellerWishes World of Cute Art. (www.wellerwishesworld.com). My biggest dream, goal and wish is to spread my Cute Art all over the world! (I’m getting there!)

Kathy Weller recycled paper greetings

2. Please could you tell me when and why you decided you wanted to license your work?

Well, I have had a unusual awareness of product art from a very early age. It was on my toys, stuffed animals, Hello Kitty mini-stationery, sheets and pillow cases. Lots of art and lots of character. I just remember being very aware of it and being a little obsessed with it. But also, I drew all the time as a kid. Drawing was just my world. I even made up my first cute character at age three or four, complete with a style sheet on how to draw him. I know, very odd!  So all of that is sort of an early clue that points directly to my life now.

As a grown-up, I’ve worked in a number of creative fields:  sales + marketing design and illustration, freelance children’s illustration, custom pet portraiture, and earlier on, my first foray into self-employment was a tiny greeting card company. But I was always fascinated by product art, character art & humor, and the greeting card industry. (And, I continued to dream about doing cards on a larger scale, long after I closed shop on my indie card company.)

There is much more information and guidance available on how to break into various niche illustration fields these days. But, with art licensing, it was basically shrouded in skeleton-key mystery until the mid-2000’s (when the web hit a new phase of mainstream saturation). In fact I only discovered that the terminology for this industry was “Art Licensing” in late 2005!  But when I did, I instinctively knew that I had to find out how to start working in it.

Kathy Weller movers and shakers

So I made plans to attend the 2006 Surtex/National Stationery Show and Licensing International. At both shows, I walked the show floors, and I took tons of seminars. During this time, I was working full-time as a graphic designer and illustrator, had a busy custom pet portrait business, and was also in the process of finally breaking into children’s publishing illustration. So, I had a lot going on. For the next few years, I juggled these various activities while my licensing goals were still alive, but on the back-burner.

Then in 2009, my mother had a devastating stroke. This horrific event led me to reprioritize everything, pretty immediately. It turned out to be the wake-up call I needed to refocus my creative energies, put my foot down and stop spreading myself so thin doing a million different things. I needed to be honest, get real, and focus on what I really wanted to do, be brave, get in the mud and pursue it! Life is short and nothing is guaranteed. If you’re lucky enough to have solid dreams and goals you want to build, there is no time to waste. My mom’s stroke snapped me awake to this fact, loud and clear. So, I made a decision to wrap up other activities by the end of 2009 so 2010 could be all about art licensing. I spent 2009 mostly with my mother in the hospital and rehab, doing the occasional craft show with my sister (which was a really necessary, and fun, distraction at the time), and wrapping up my pet portraiture business. The last thing I did was resign from working with my children’s illustration agent in early 2010. Since that time, I’ve been focused on my art licensing/character art/greeting card/social expressions goals.

Kathy Weller Swirly Cakes Illustration

3. How did you first start trying to license you work – what was the process?

Well, I had gained a lot of insight into the process by attending those shows in 2006, so I put a lot of the advice I’d learned to use. I also hired an art licensing consultant in 2008 to gain more one-on-one insights and more individualized feedback. I then started creating work that I thought would be appropriate for the areas in licensing that I thought were right for my style, and I started approaching manufacturers as well as agents.

Kathy Weller Towntails Illustration

4. What did you do right and wrong in your early licensing endeavors?

A ton! I am a work in progress, as is everyone. No mistakes? You’re a robot. You just have to find your way on an individual level. There is no one-size-fits-all Playbook. There is a ton of information out there these days, though—  lots of e-books, and the ones I’ve read have been mostly very helpful, and some I’d heartily recommend. But ultimately, there’s only so much learning that happens from reading other’s experiences and how-to’s. There comes a time when you have to live your own.. You get to where you just have to do it. I will admit that I got stuck in the “learning cog” for a little while. It’s safer and more comfortable to learn and read and study and dream then it is to daringly jump in with both feet and just do it. I was nervous and scared! But, finally, I sucked it up and jumped in. And once I did, it felt really amazing. I was immensely proud of myself, and it was so empowering!

Kathy Weller Bracelets

5. How do you present work to a potential company you wanted to license to? (how many pieces, how many styles, by email? etc)

If it’s a company I want to work with, I will usually email them first, provided I have the right person and email address. If I don’t, I need to make an initial phone call to obtain that information.

I do like to do a first intro through email as opposed to over the phone though, because people are so busy. Email is far less intrusive and way more flexible for people to digest. The flip-side is, you can get lost in the email shuffle. You just have to use your best judgement on how and when to follow up with them. If I get a positive response from my email, a phone call usually follows in short order!

There is no denying that cold calls can be extremely effective though. I am just careful about the who, what, when, where, and why. If I make a call as first contact, I just make sure I am as prepared as I can possibly be. 🙂

What you send out as samples is really wholly dependent on the specific client and their needs. They will usually share what they need with you, if you ask. Sometimes they’ll be more specific, sometimes more vague. Then, I will see what I have that fits. Depending on their deadline for samples, I will then decide what else I can do to accommodate them further. This is usually gets to be a smoother process the longer I work with a client. Once you know your people well and have your system down, it’s easier to anticipate things before they come up, and to accommodate them when they do!

I love to meet people in person. I know that is not always possible, but usually manufacturers will attend at least one show a year. Trade shows are great for meeting up with people who you’d like to work with, or, who you already are working with, or people you’ve been emailing with and submitting work to. Nothing beats face-to-face meeting! So keep the relationship alive, whether or not you’re actually working with them yet. If there’s good potential and you really like each other, invite them to your booth to peruse your latest and greatest designs, and to see what new product lines they have going that you might be able to help them with!

Kathy Weller bunnies illustration

6. Do you use, or have you used an licensing agent and why? What are the pros and cons of this?

I currently have a licensing agent in Japan. In all other territories, I represent myself. In licensing, I’ve worked non-exclusively with a couple of art licensing agents sporadically over the past couple of years, and before that, I had an agent for my children’s illustration work from 2007-2010.

I think having an agent can be extremely great! But  it has to be the right place, time, overall fit. The agent/artist relationship is a serious one. Licensing agents generally earn 50% so you truly are partners. You want to be sure it will be a mutually beneficial and rewarding relationship!

Before you sign with an agent, get to know their business. Understand the markets they serve.  Learn which companies they tend to work with, the markets they serve, and the aesthetic + thematic genres they specialize in. Does their work favor specific demographics?

Now, turn the tables. Would THEY be a good fit with YOUR brand, as your brand stands today? Where would you hope to go together as partners in your brand?

Kathy Weller Puzzle

Talk to other artists in their roster. (If they have a problem with this, run, don’t walk, in the other direction.) Would your work + style be a compliment to their overall group? Would your work offer variety and a spark of fresh, new ideas, while still fitting comfortably into the genres they serve? Or, is your work, just a little too similar to another of their current artists? An agent might cultivate a roster that offers a lot of variety within a pretty specific art genre so keep that on your radar when looking at potential agents, but don’t get too bogged down in the details.

Ultimately, there are a million reasons why you may or may not a great fit for a particular agent. They are the only ones who can tell you that. But I will leave you with this: if you hear or read a “No”, please pay attention to the entire paragraph, not just that one word. A “No” today may not mean “No” forever. Sometimes it does, but sometimes it doesn’t. Are they telling you something else, too? What else are you picking up from the rest of the message?

Turn over every rock you feel you need to. It’s integral to do a lot of back-and-forth and get to know each other before partnering with an agent. And… go with your gut.

Kathy Weller Iphone Cases

7. Can you remember the first designs you licensed, what were they, and how did it feel?

I don’t think it was officially my first, but still, receiving the first pieces of my Jive Cats fabric collection with Northcott Fabrics was nothing less than thrilling. I’d always wanted to do fabric, and here it was, complete with my very own kitty cat characters, that I created. It was magic!

Kathy Weller Jivecats

8. What is your favourite bit of work you have licensed?

The Jive Cats puzzle I did for Andrews + Blaine sticks out in my head as true symbiosis of art, product and function. It’s a 1,000 piece jigsaw puzzle, and the puzzle art is mind-boggling, eye-crossing puzzle perfection. It’s a super-challenging puzzle— easily the hardest jigsaw puzzle I have ever done—and I did the art!. But, I love how it turned out, down to the packaging: a sturdy, well-made slide-out box with a satin ribbon pulley! Too cute! (http://www.thejivecats.com/ )

All work featured above is copyright © Kathy Weller

Find out more about Kathy and her work at WellerWishes, on her blog at www.wellerwishesworld.com, on Twitter @wellerwishes and Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/WellerWishes-Illustration-Design-Kathy-Weller

Made By Oomph! Competition with Graphic Design Blog

oomph plastic cards

Plastic card printing company Oomph! are offering a giveaway to 1 GDB reader for 500 of Oomph’s plastic cards! If you’ve not come across Oomph! before, they are a design and plastic card printing company based in the UK.

A Little More About Oomph!

Mediocrity is not in the Oomph! vocabulary. They’re passionate about delivering plastic cards of distinction through nothing less than the best possible service, at a price that delights. You can select one of their designer templates or upload your own artwork to create truly unique products. Oomph! also print membership cards and contactless cards, check them out at www.madebyoomph.co.uk to try out a free sample.

Competition Prize

500 Plastic Cards – one lucky winner will win a set of 500 plastic cards from Oomph!

How To Win!

To win one the prize, all you have to do is leave a comment below and tell us, what’s the most creative use you can think of for a plastic card? Be creative, fun and most importantly unique! If you make us smile you’re in with a great chance of walking away with some great prizes.

Winners will be chosen from the comments below. Please remember to enter a valid email address so we can send you your prizes. Closing date for comment entry 31st January 2013.

oomph logo

10 Killer Die-Cuts for Design Inspiration

A guest post by Brian Morris who writes for the PsPrint Design & Printing Blog. 

Die cutting is one of the best ways to make your printed marketing tools and packaging stand out from the crowd. For your inspiration, check out the following 10 killer die cuts.

1. Epson Packaging by Ali Prater

This clever design by Ali Prater not only has a cool look, it’s also functional in that it indicates which type of printer cartridge is in the box. The splash of color underneath adds another dimension to an already-awesome die cut.

espson diecut packaging

2. Super You by Matthew Hawkins

Matthew Hawkins’ die-cut creation makes the perfect attention-commanding point-of-sale flyer.

Super You diecut packaging

3. Brand Card by Brand-It

When you have an outstanding logo, there’s no better way to put an exclamation point on it than with a die-cut business card.

Brand card diecut packaging

4. Big 6 by Tim Hansen

Forget bland white envelopes; brand your company with powerfully designed die-cut stationery.

Big 6 diecut packaging

5. Super Happy Times by Jordan Metcalf

Make your greeting cards more fun and memorable with die cuts.

Super Happy Times diecut packaging

6. Mos Burger Calendar by Andrew Wong

Die cuts help these cool calendars stand up to the competition!

Mos-Burger Die cut packaging

7. Smiley Business Card by Driv Loo

Simplicity sells. This die-cut business card isn’t complicated, but it is attention-getting and memorable for powerful branding.

Smiley Die cut packaging

8. Generation Green Card by Pei Ru Chang

This super-cool business card features a unique die cut that makes it impossible to ignore – and presents an opportunity for guerrilla marketing. Excellent design, all the way around!

Generation-Green Die cut

9. Shirt Business Card by Lemongraphic

This fun-yet-serious business card die cut ties in perfectly to the unique theme.

Shirt-Business card die cut

10. Christmas Tree Card by Steff Geissbuhler

This creative greeting card die cut interacts with the recipient – when opened, it forms a pop-out Christmas tree.

Christmas Tree diecut

Author’s Bio: Brian Morris writes for the PsPrint Design & Printing Blog. PsPrint is an online commercial printing company. Follow PsPrint on Twitter @PsPrint and Facebook.